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Inside Look at the Aftermath of A Horrific Motorcycle Accident In Indianapolis

A couple of months ago, we read about a terrible motorcycle accident in Indiana which resulted in the death of one rider and serious injuries to two others.

Now a local news source has gotten ahold of police department radio transmissions of what went down on the day an Indianapolis metro police officer slammed into three riders on the north side of that city. The accident killed Eric Wells and injured two others.

On the recordings, a police commander called for an immediate investigation but told a dispatcher that the accident was not alcohol-related.

More than half an hour after Officer David Bisard crashed his patrol car into the motorcyclists, Major John Conley called in the city’s  Fatal Accident and Fatal Alcohol Crash Team.

“Hey, this is John Conley,” the major said to the dispatcher. “Can you tell me if the FACT team has been ordered for this crash?”

When Conley was advised that no such request had been made, the commander at the scene responded, “Authority of car 3 Chief (Ron) Hix can we go ahead and start them back this way?”

The dispatcher says, “Okay. Do we want the regular? Okay. I would guess that’s Fact 1 we want…right?…when there’s suspected alcohol?”

“Yeah,” says Conley, “but in this case its not suspected alcohol so there’s an officer involved.”

Minutes later the dispatcher confirmed that FACT investigators had been contacted.

“And if just did your FACT page and I did FACT 6. That’s not for alcohol related.”

“Right,” answered Conley. “That’s it.”

Shortly after, Conley again contacted the dispatcher and asked that she contact the FACT investigators.

“Is there any way you can contact them and have them divert to Methodist Occupational Health Clinic on Southeastern Avenue? We’re going to take the officer away from the scene and take him there.”

Conley says he was, at the time, not aware that a change had been made to state law which required that blood drawn to determine if a driver has been using alcohol must be taken at a hospital and not at a clinic. He added that he wanted to keep officer Bisard and other police officers separated from family members of the victims who were gathering at Methodist Hospital.

Authorities say it’s that error in where blood samples were drawn which originally led Marion County Prosecutor to withdraw the evidence that Bisard’s BAC of  .19% from the criminal case. That decision was later reversed by Prosecutor Terry Curry and he decided to include the evidence in his case.

A medic at Wishard Memorial Hospital,  Barbara Miller, treated Bisard at the accident scene.

“I smelled nothing. Honest to God, I smelled nothing. I was shocked when I heard it,” Miller said in her deposition on the matter.

A doctor who examined Bisard said he was equally surprised by the results of the officer’s blood alcohol test.

“I was shocked. .19 (BAC), that’s pretty high and he didn’t have any indication of that, that I could see.”

In a copy of an internal report, exclusively obtained by Fox59 News in Indianapolis, and written by Metro PD Detectives Rick Burkhardt and Tom Lehn, refer to a conversation Bisard’s wife had with an IMPD officer in the days after the crash.

“Mrs. Bisard told Sgt. (Craig) Heddon that her husband drank the night before and woke up at 0200 hrs that morning to “get a drink.”

Bisard’s wife said her husband was not drunk – and had not been drinking –  in the hours immediate before the fatal crash. Bisard’s attorney, John Kautzman added, “We have printouts from the car’s power train control module showing the brakes failed, plus some other documents.”

However the case plays out, the recording offers a chilling document of a terrible moment.

“I need a medic rush to 56th and Brendon Park Way. Been involved in a PI accident.

“I’ve hit a motorcycle. There’s two people down. Actually there’s three people down.

“Shut it down from 465 and shut it down back to Arlington.

“Control, if we have a K9 supervisor on duty I’m gonna need him on duty here, too.”