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The Trailer Queen Question – Ride It, Or Tow It And Then Ride It

You’re going on that road trip to Bike Week or Bike Time or Sturgis. The road ahead is long and fraught with peril, so do you ride your machine or roll it up on a trailer packed with essential gear and your precious ride to make the journey?

It’s an internal monologue many riders have faced over the years and it comes down to a couple of basic arguments; the hardcore rider says putting a motorcycle on a trailer is akin to committing biker heresy, the pro-trailer faction cites the practicality and convenience of having additional storage and tools along for the trip.

The debate rages on.

Kendon Industries, Inc. president and professional rider, Frank Esposito, is willing to offer you some tips if you opt for the trailer option.

“It used to be that most people only bought a trailer to take their bike in for repairs,” Esposito said. “Now the perception is growing that a trailer can add a new dimension to their motorcycling experience as it increases the opportunity for adventure.”

The average rider doesn’t go beyond a 150-200 mile radius of their garage, and physical limitations prevent a growing number of riders from traveling longer distances.

“It comes down to a simple matter of quality vs. quantity,” Esposito said. “Using a trailer for motorcycles is a sensible way to get out of the comfort circle and change riding habits from a typical ride to a weekend adventure while opening up new riding opportunities.”

What’s the upside of hauling a trailer? The trailer option opens up the possibility of multi-day adventures brings planned weekend getaways with family and friends who don’t ride into the picture.

“Having rested and happy companions doesn’t hurt either,” Esposito said. “Motorcycle trailers definitely help enthusiasts enjoy more of their passion by allowing for comfortable, convenient and fun times in distant riding destinations. A trailer really allows you to look at what is beyond that 150-200 mile comfort circle.”

On the flip side of the coin are the hardcore contingent who believe putting a running motorcycle on a trailer is the Devil’s Work.

The flip side comes from riders like a guy who bills himself as BoldBiker. He relates a story about meeting a family on the road during his ride to Sturgis

“They were on their way back to Kansas where he owned an airplane.  They had no idea about Sturgis but just happened to be passing through to see Mt Rushmore after their vacation in Yellowstone,” says BoldBiker. ” He looked around and said,  ‘This makes me want to buy a Harley and come up here next year.’  Then he watched the bikes go by a while, turned to me and asked, ‘What do you all do up here?’  I tried to explain how it was like Woodstock…just being here.  Then I realized he had no clue. He is a RUB.  There are the folks who trailer a bike 1500 miles, apply fake tattoos and ride around feeling like they are ‘bikers.’  They’re on the other extreme.

BoldBiker is willing to give people a pass, but only if they’re not just putting on the costume.

“The real line is somewhere between and I can’t define it.  I also believe there is another group in the middle…the motorcyclists.  These are the folks who understand bikes, who ride them for the sheer joy of being out of a cage, who appreciate the differences in smells and temperatures as they ride through the hills.  But their bikes are something they ride…not who they are,” BoldBiker said. “Does it make a difference?  Not to me.  I just chuckle at RUBs and as long as they don’t bother me I don’t bother them. They wave, I wave, we are all on the road. Motorcyclists are okay folks.  They don’t pretend to be anything other than what they are.”


Whether you ride a sport bike or an American cruiser, your insurance needs can get complicated.

We’re here to help you find the right motorcycle insurance, whatever you ride…

Tips for buying your motorcycle insurance, coverage you need:

  • Collision to pay for damage caused to your vehicle in an accident with another vehicle or any stationary object.
  • Comprehensive to cover such things as fire, hail, wind, vandalism, hitting an animal, etc.
  • Towing / Pickup
  • Medical payment or personal injury protection to cover the medical bills resulting from an accident.
  • Uninsured or underinsured motorist to protect us when the other driver is at-fault and does not have coverage or assets out of which your bills can be paid.

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